Filling in the Global Map for the Anglican Communion

From my latest post at Covenant, the blog of The Living Church:

So, let’s imagine a country where the Communion has no presence. Let’s imagine a country where having a Bible is against the law and where citizens who become Christians might be executed. Let’s think about a place where there is not a single church building. In the words of John Lennon, “It’s easy if you try.”

What would establishing a missionary diocese there look like?

Read it all HERE.

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Author: duanemiller

I was born in Montana and grew up in Colorado and Puebla (in Mexico). I completed a BA in philosophy at the University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) and then an MA in theology at St Mary's University (also in San Antonio). Later life took me to Jordan where my wife and I studied Arabic, to Israel where I helped found a seminary, and to Scotland for doctoral work, among other places. I live in Madrid now where I teach and minister. I'm highly interested in the interactions of Islam, Christianity and secularism in modern contexts. My main areas of research for my PhD in divinity were religious conversion from Islam to Christianity, contextual theology, and the shari'a's treatment of apostates. I've also published research on global Anglicanism and the history of Anglican mission in the Ottoman Empire. I've had the pleasure of teaching in many places over the years: from Costa Rica to Turkey, and Kenya to Tunisia. I am associate professor at the Protestant Faculty of Theology at Madrid (UEBE) and priest at the Anglican Cathedral of the Redeemer in Madrid, Spain. Visit my blog (duanemiller.wordpress.com) or academia.edu page for more information.

2 thoughts on “Filling in the Global Map for the Anglican Communion”

  1. I’ve always thought the Orthodox Church should do something like this for Turkey, taking all those titular episcopates like Diokleia and Pergamon, and instead of giving them to venerable souls, consecrating secret missionary bishops to re-evangelise what was once part of Greek Christianity’s heartland.

  2. Excellent article Duane. Did I ever tell you about my great-grandfather the Rev. Frederick Steffler? When he immigrated from Germany in 1867, at the age of 19, he studied for 3 years. He was called to preach the gospel and became a Methodist-Episcopal circuit-riding preacher throughout Iowa, Wisconsin & So. Dakota. That was his mission field for his time in history.

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