Mark Durie’s prayers of renunciation

The Rev. Dr. Mark Durie has done some very important work on the theme of conversion from Islam to Christianity. He argues in his book Liberty to the Captives that converts should openly and liturgically renounce their former covenant with Allah that was mediated through Muhammad.

This is especially relevant in relation to those dealing with the baptism of a convert, since it is the sacrament whereby one enters into the Church, which is to say the people of the New Covenant—one with a different mediator.

Learn more by reading this interesting (if provocative) PDF:

Prayers for Freedom

Baptizing a Convert from Islam with an Anglican Liturgy

Here is my latest material from Anglican Compass (formerly Anglican Pastor):

I didn’t even remember the phone call. One evening when I was loafing around the house an Arabophone brother called me from a foreign country and had some questions about our small Arabophone fellowship, Kanisa. What did we believe? I answered: we had an evangelical orientation and confessed the Apostles’ and Nicene creeds. Did we belong to a particular denomination? I answered: I’m an Anglican priest and the other pastors come from Assemblies of God and Methodist backgrounds, though we welcome people from the Catholic and Orthodox Churches, ex-Muslims, and Muslim seekers too.

Read the rest of it HERE.

Select Articles from St Francis Magazine (2005–2006)

Years ago I helped with the publication of St Francis Magazine. It was an online journal that focused on Christianity in Arab and Muslim-majority contexts. I have an archive of most (maybe all) of the articles. I thought that since I’m stuck inside our flat in Madrid with extra time on my hands I would share some of those via this blog.

These are just a few of my favorite ones, though I understand that others are available at Academia.edu and Scribd.com, so if you’re looking for a specific article and it’s not here, please head over to those websites.

These are articles from St Francis Magazine, 2005–2006 (the first and second years of publication). If you are interested in other articles please let me know.

Peace,

Duane+

The Translation of the Bible – Bassam Madany

The Jewishness of Jesus – Dr Bernhard Reitsma

Public Liturgical Prayer in Islam and Christianity

Evaluating Insider Movements C5 Messianic Muslims – By Bill Nikides

Is there still need for mission to Muslims – by Rev. Colin Chapman

Barry Peters – The role of dreams and visions in the apostolate to Muslims

Who are the Copts – Fr Tadros Y Malaty

Daisy Marsh – Missionary to the Kabyles

If you’re interested in more of these articles please let me know. SFM really did publish some outstanding work (and some substandard work, I’m sure). But it filled a gap that no one else did at the time and, I think, no one does today.

The Role of History in Pastoral Care for Christians from a Muslim background

A paragraph from my latest article:

It is common for apostates from Islam, and especially for converts to Christianity, to be construed as betraying their people. This reality comes across quite clearly in the many autobiographical books written by CMBs, that there was a genuine struggle for them in formulating and explaining that while they had left Islam, they were still loyal citizens of their nation. The intention of the two pastors in selecting Church history was, I suspect, to provide the CMBs with the historical resources whereby an intelligent and informed answer could be given to the question, “Why have you betrayed your people by leaving Islam.”

Get the PDF at academia or read it in two parts at the New Wineskins blog (part 1, part 2).

Jeff Morton reviews Two Stories of Everything

Jeff Morton has recently reviewed my book Two Stories of Everything (Credo House, 2018) for the Journal of Global Christianity.

Here is one section:

Miller’s presentation of Islam’s story is spot on. He offers us a conservative, orthodox, Sunni version of Islam; since this would include the majority of Muslims, it is a wise choice. The heartbeat of each of the two metanarratives, as he sees it, is anthropology. I think this will surprise most readers. Why? One might suppose the doctrine of God is the essential and defining doctrine of any religion. Yet Miller takes an approach that is anthropocentric. It is each religion’s view of human beings that directs the story, he claims. God may have initiated the story, but the object of divine action is humankind – essentially true for both Christianity and Islam. Let the reader not be surprised; I am confident Miller will win you over in the end…

The PDF of the journal is available HERE.

Sobre el Bautismo para el ex-Musulman Cristiano: Algunas observaciones pastorales

Originalmente publicada en inglés en el blog de New Wineskins, aquí está la versión en español en La Luz: Pensamiento Anglicano.

Baptism for the ex-Muslim Christian

I have lately been working on a book on pastoral care for Christians from a Muslim background (CMBs). Rather than write everything and then publish the book, I’m taking a new approach: publishing sections gradually while seeking feedback and comments. So here is my first installment. Do let me know if you have any comments or questions or advice:

(These were originally published as blog entries at New Wineskins: part 1, part 2.)