Christianity in Palestine, Lecture 3: The Content and Method of Jesus’ Mission

Lecture 3: The content and method of Jesus’ mission

Nazareth Seminary, Fall of 2012.

Lecture questions: In what ways was Jesus’ ministry original? In what ways did he simply carry on established traditions? What was the content of his teaching? And how did he envision to accomplish that goal?

Anglican Mission in the Middle East, Part 2

Duane Alexander Miller's Blog

A lecture on Anglican Mission in the Middle East Pt 2. Part 2 of 2.

Delivered at Braun Station, San Antonio, Texas, in May 2011. Covering Anglican mission in the Middle East prior to WWI.

Key topics are the mission of Horatio Southgate to Constantinople, the work of the London Jews Society in Jerusalem and the Church of England’s mission to the Nestorians (Assyrians) of Kurdistan.

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Anglican Mission in the Middle East, part 1

I have a couple of new subscribers and thought this audio lecture might be of interest.

Duane Alexander Miller's Blog

A lecture on 05 Anglican Mission in the Middle East Pt 1. Part 1 of 2.

Delivered at Braun Station, San Antonio, Texas, in May 2011. Covering Anglican mission in the Middle East prior to WWI.

Key topics are the Episcopal mission of Horatio Southgate to Constantinople, the work of the London Jews Society in Jerusalem and the Church of England’s mission to the Nestorians (Assyrians) of Kurdistan.

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The Religious Marketplace and Conversion from Islam to Christianity

In this lecture I utilize the analogy of the religious marketplace to help to understand why increasing numbers of Muslims are converting to Christianity in various places throughout the world. This lecture was prepared for a popular audience.

Miller, Duane Alexander. 2011. ‘The Religious Marketplace and Conversion from Islam to Christianity’. Lecture. Braun Station, San Antonio, Texas. 47 minutes.

Click on the link to listen to the mp3, or right click and choose ‘save link as…’ to download the mp3: 04 The ‘Religious Marketplace’ and Conversion from Islam to Christianity

Review: When We Lived in Jerusalem, by Estelle Blyth

When We Lived in JerusalemWhen We Lived in Jerusalem by Estelle Blyth

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Estelle Blyth (1881-1983) was the daughter of G F P Blyth, the fourth Anglican bishop in Jerusalem. In this charming memoir she recalls the years she lived in Jerusalem in the early 20th Century.

Blyth has a keen eye for details, and provides fine descriptions of Muslim wedding ceremonies, the visit of the German kaiser, and aspects of Orthodox liturgy and tradition then-present in Jerusalem.

She is writing during the years of the British Mandate, so one concern of hers, which becomes very clear in the last pages, is to encourage the British not to abandon Palestine. Given that she was writing prior to WW2 this was a prescient position.

Her father was an anglo-catholic churchman, and she shared his spiritual leanings. Thus she is sympathetic to the Orthodox Church and not a little critical of the low-church evangelical missionaries who had laid the groundwork for the diocese under Bp Samuel Gobat by converting Orthodox Christians to Protestantism.

All in all the Arabs come out as being (more or less) fine people, as do the Armenians. Pure-blooded Turks are magnificent, she says, but the Ottoman Empire is rightly denounced for never really improving Palestine. Her experiences with Jews lead her to unfavorable statements which some might judge as anti-Semitic.

The book contains numerous good photographs. This book is useful to scholars of history, whether professional or amateur. Her ceaseless cheering for the British becomes a bit tiresome. Her astute observations on the relation of certain biblical images to practices then current in Palestine foreshadows the later of work scholars like Kenneth Bailey.

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