“Is the West finally winning the war against ISIS?”

I was recently interviewed by David Virtue, of VirtueOnline fame, on the state of Anglicanism in the Middle East, the Islamic State, the future or Christianity in MENA, and, of course, my new book, Living among the Breakage.

Here is my answer to his question on the Islamic State:

VOL: Is the West finally winning the war against ISIS?

MILLER: It depends on what you mean by winning. If you mean that they are losing land, then I would say that Iraq, supported by the West and Iran, is winning the war. But over the long term, I’m not very optimistic. The loss of territory for the Islamic State will result in enormous flows of migrants into Europe. Inevitably, a substantial number of those refugees will want to Islamize the countries that receive them as refugees. And among those, a certain number will utilize strategic violence in order to try and effectuate what they understand to be a divine mission. So if by winning you mean eradicating the religious convictions that animate movements like the IS, my answer is resounding no.

Read it all HERE.

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Challenges faced by ex-Muslim Christians

I was recently interviewed about Living among the Breakage by the DWTX blog (read it all HERE).

Here is one question I was asked, specifically about the challenges faced by converts.

DWTX: And what do [converts from Islam to Christianity] find most challenging?

Miller: The greatest challenge these believers face is not persecution. Persecution is very real, and the traditional sentence in the shari’a for apostasy from Islam is execution. Shari’a states don’t always carry out this punishment, but everyone knows it, including Christians. But the greatest challenge faced by these believers is the formation of a stable, new identity. In the West we are used to categorizing life and identity, but most societies are not like us. Islam, for all its faults, provides a comprehensive way of life—political, spiritual, legal, familial—that provides a way of making sense and ordering the entirety of life. When women and men leave Islam for Christ they are given a new spiritual order—the Christian faith—but what about everything else? Also, in much of the Muslim world, ethnicity and Islam are tied up together. I have seen this very clearly in Turkey, for instance, where there is a small but growing church consisting of Turkish Christians.

Read the rest of the interview HERE.

Living among the Breakage: Contextual Theology-making and ex-Muslim Christians

Dear Colleagues,

I would like to share with you all that my book Living among the Breakage: Contextual Theology-making and ex-Muslim Christians is now available for purchase. PICKWICK_Template

Here is the ‘about’ summary from the publisher page:

Around the world people are leaving Islam for Christianity in unprecedented numbers. This book seeks to look into the world of some of these converts, trying to discern the shape of their newfound faith. Why do they convert? What challenges do they face? And ultimately, what do they in their own complex and sometimes difficult circumstances claim to have understood about God that, while in Islam, they had not? In other words, what is the content of their contextual theology? In seeking to answer these questions, Miller looks into the world of an unintentional church plant in the Arab world consisting of believers from a Muslim background, visits with groups of Iranian converts in the diaspora, and examines the written testimonies of still other converts. In a world where Muslim-Christian relations are increasingly important and sometimes tendentious, this book examines the lived faith and contextual theology of people who have chosen to leave Islam and embrace Christianity.

Buy the book or read reviews at the publisher page HERE or get the Kindle version HERE.

All my articles from St Francis Magazine

Over the years I have published a number of articles in St Francis Magazine. The online journal focused on Christianity and Christian witness in the context of the Arab world specifically, and the Muslim world more broadly.

I always felt the journal played a unique role. But word has reached me through the grapevine that the website became too costly to maintain. The PDFs of the articles will hopefully be made available some time down the road. But I’m not in charge of that.

But for now, I am able to make my own articles available. So, here are numerous links…

Freedom of Religion in Israel-Palestine: may Muslims become Christians, and do Christians have the freedom to welcome such converts?

The Conversion of Samira

‘Your Swords do not Concern me at all’: the liberation theology of Islamic Christianity

Christ Church (Anglican) in Nazareth: a brief history with photographs

Into the Light: the liberation theology of Steven Masood, a Christian ex-Muslim

Reappropriation: an accommodationist hermeneutic of Islamic Christianity

Cracks in the Foundation of Islam?

Narrative and Metanarrative in Islam and Christianity

The Sign of Jonah in Matthew 16: Missio-centric Reading applied to the Arab World

Global Census of Believers in Christ from a Muslim Background (BMBs)

I am pleased to share that Patrick Johnstone and I have just published an article in the Interdisciplinary Journal of Research on Religion. The title of the article is “Believers in Christ from a Muslim Background: A Global Census.” Here is the abstract:

Since the 1960s, there has been a substantial increase in the number of known conversions from Islam to Christianity. Most of these conversions have been to forms of evangelical or Pentecostal Christianity, but there have also been conversions to Catholic and Orthodox Christianity, and still other converts claim to remain in some way both Muslims and followers of Jesus. This article ex- plains how we obtained estimates of the number of converts, the complexities involved in this task, and an annotated list of countries by continent with the estimated number of believers in Christ from a Muslim background. The article includes charts with maximal, minimal, and medium estimates of this population from 1960 to the present.

The article is available at Johnstone and Miller Global BMB Census or for free from the journal’s website.

“Finding an End in the Beginning: eschatological trends among ex-Muslim Christians” (Chapter)

In 2014 the book Islam and the Last Day: Christian Perspectives on Islamic Eschatology was released by MST Press (Wantirna, Australia). In that book I published a chapter on how some ex-Muslim Christians agree or disagree with Islamic eschatology, and how they envision certain features of apocalyptic and eschatological realities.

I have recently posted the PDF of that chapter at my academia.edu site. It can be read HERE.