Filling in the Global Map for the Anglican Communion

From my latest post at Covenant, the blog of The Living Church:

So, let’s imagine a country where the Communion has no presence. Let’s imagine a country where having a Bible is against the law and where citizens who become Christians might be executed. Let’s think about a place where there is not a single church building. In the words of John Lennon, “It’s easy if you try.”

What would establishing a missionary diocese there look like?

Read it all HERE.

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“Reaching out to Arabic migrants in Spain” in Anglican World

My colleague Spencer Reece and I recently had this brief article published in the magazine Anglican World. It is about some of the ministry going on here in Spain among Arabic-speaking migrants here.

Click Anglican World Article to read the PDF.

Reviewing Andy Stanley’s *Deep and Wide*

Deep and WideDeep and Wide by Andy Stanley

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

My wife and I have been in full-time Christian ministry for some 14 years now. I presently serve as pastor at the Anglican cathedral in Madrid. My main work has not been as a congregation pastor, but I’ve done a lot of teaching at churches throughout the USA and other countries as well. I’ve had many, many opportunities to see what is working and what is not working. I’ve seen that in everything from home churches to megachurches. I’ve seen it across denominations: Anglican, Baptist, Lutheran, Methodist, Nazarene, Pentecostal—you name it.

A ministry partner of mine bought this book for me and my wife, Sharon. We slowly read it together over two years or so. But we did read it. We just finished it last night.

I’m excited about this book. I want to recommend it to everyone in church leadership and especially for pastors. I want to recommend it to people from every single denomination. Yes, yes, he’s not sensitive to liturgical realities, I get it. But still there is so much to learn and apply from this book.

The author’s main goal is to tell you how to create a church that is welcoming to unchurched people. He gives you pointers on sermons, ministry, leadership, and basic nut and bolts things like welcoming people and music. There is a load of useful stuff in here. Also, his writing style is easygoing and very readable.

Pick it up. Read it. You won’t regret it.

View all my reviews

Why Some Muslims are Attracted to Christianity

More Muslims have converted to the Way of Jesus Christ in the last four decades than in all the other years since the advent of Islam in the 7th Century. Something is certainly happening among Muslims and there is an openness in their society that was not there before. It’s also important to note that large numbers of nominal Christians, especially in Europe, are converting to Islam–a main reason being so they can marry Muslim women. Who has more converts? Not sure about that. I will say that Muslims converting to Christianity often pay a heavy price in terms of persecution, and that Westerners converting to Islam are afforded generous protection by their governments.

But here is the question: why are some Muslims attracted to the way of Jesus Christ? Here are some of the main reasons…

Read the rest of my article at the New Wineskins blog.

“Thinking about Mission the Anglican Way” in *The Living Church*

I’m glad to share a new article just published at the blog of The Living Church. I am basically asking why Anglicans have a concrete approach to music, theology, and architecture, but don’t seem to have anything like this when it comes to global mission. Here is the lead:

Like most Christians, we Anglicans tend to love our traditions and cherish our identity, from the prayer book and particular holy days, or to the very idea of being a via media, Reformed and Catholic at the same time. We are excited when a new church plant or satellite campus opens, and in some Anglican circles there has been a veritable revival in church planting in North America and the United Kingdom. We usually appreciate our diversity — that one can be catholic or evangelical or liberal, though the last decade has tested some important boundaries. We like to send our ordinands off to seminaries within our tradition, we read books by our tradition’s authors (though not exclusively, of course), and we even have our styles of architecture and hymnody.

But then something funny happens on the way to world evangelism. When it comes to cross-cultural missionary work, we quickly forget about our Anglican distinctives. This doesn’t happen in other areas, so why does it happen with cross-cultural and global mission?

Check it all out here.

Stephen Bedard reviews *Two Stories of Everything*

Stephen J. Bedard has an excellent blog, Hope’s Reason, and solid presence on Twitter (@sjbedard).

I’m happy to share with you his recent review of my book Two Stories of Everything: The Competing Metanarratives of Islam and ChristianityHere’s one section:

There are a number of things that I appreciated about Miller’s book. One is that it is both a good introduction to Islam and also a nice summary of the Christian metanarrative. I also liked Miller’s honest and humble perspective. In his conclusion, Miller says, “I hope that I am as critical of Christianity as I am of Islam, and I see the umma doing a number of things correctly that I don’t see the Church, by and large, doing correctly” (p. 134). Two Stories of Everything is not a polemic against Islam, even though Miller is transparent about his own Christian faith. In addition, each chapter includes reflection questions and there is a handy glossary at the end of the book.

Go to his blog to read the whole review.

La Señal de Jonás y el Missio ad Gentes

Jonah thrown into the Sea.jpg
Jonah being thrown into the sea. (Public Domain), Link


Me da gusto compartir que mi primera publicación para Escritorio Anglicano ya ha sido publicada. El artículo es un analysis de este pasaje:

Vinieron los fariseos y los saduceos para tentarle, y le pidieron que les mostrase señal del cielo. Mas él respondiendo, les dijo: Cuando anochece, decís: Buen tiempo; porque el cielo tiene arreboles.  Y por la mañana: Hoy habrá tempestad; porque tiene arreboles el cielo nublado. ¡Hipócritas! que sabéis distinguir el aspecto del cielo, ¡mas las señales de los tiempos no podéis!  La generación mala y adúltera demanda señal; pero señal no le será dada, sino la señal del profeta Jonás. Y dejándolos, se fue.

                                                                                 —Mateo 16:1-4 (RV60)

La referencia de Jesús al signo de Jonás a la vez cautiva nuestra atención porque Jonás parece ser un tipo relativamente menor para Cristo dado las alusiones más pronunciadas y frecuentes a los paralelos entre Jesús y David (un rey salvador) y Jesús y Moisés (a legislador). En este documento veremos el significado de esta frase y su relación al misso ad gentes.

Puede leer mas aquí.