Marthe Curry interviews Duane Miller

Last year my book Living among the Breakage: Contextual Theology-making and ex-Muslim Christians was published by Pickwick.

I sat down with Dr. Marthe Curry, director of the Department of World Mission based out of San Antonio, Texas, to talk about it. That interview has now been published in Global Missiology (15:1). Here is an excerpt:

MC: Why do MBBs [Muslim-background believers] seem to be more comfortable in evangelical settings? Or is the correct question Are evangelicals more evangelistic than liturgical/traditional denominations?

DAM: One might think that since the ancient churches of the Muslim world are mostly Eastern or Oriental Orthodox, that people would be converting to those forms of Christianity. But that rarely happens. First, those ancient churches are still suffering from the trauma of centuries of living as dhimmis under the sharia. It was a belittling and dehumanizing way to live wherein Christians (and Jews) were routinely publicly humiliated by Muslim rulers. Christians could always convert to Islam, but were not allowed to evangelize Muslims or even learn about Islam. This has led in many places to quietism and seeing Islam as invincible. One pastor has likened how these Christians see Muslims to how a prostitute views her pimp as someone who really loves her, even though no one else sees it that way. Second, evangelicalism—as broad as that term is—places a great deal of importance on conversion. The strength of evangelicalism is that each and every Christian is seen as an evangelist. In other churches people tend to assume the priest or bishop is in charge of evangelism—if they even know what the word means. I will say that theologically there is nothing in Anglicanism, Catholicism or Orthodoxy that preclude vigorous evangelism by the laity. The barrier really is pastoral.

Read it all online HERE or read the PDF through academia.edu.

Advertisements

“La Iglesia Catedral del Redentor”

The Reformed Episcopal Church of Spain (of which I am a clergy member) published this booklet some decades ago. It really needs to be updated! However, there is little information available about the Anglican Cathedral of the Redeemer in Madrid, so I thought I would make this booklet available to any researcher or curious party.  I scanned it and it can now be found at Scribd. Also, check out the cathedral’s homepage.

A tidy list of all my publications…

A while back I realized I really didn’t know how much I had published or where. So I decided to keep a file with that information. And even then, I miss out on stuff from time to time.

I was just updating it tonight and thought I should share it on academia.edu. So I did that (here). But then I thought, why not post it at my blog too. So if you want to download the PDF with all my publications ever, here it is: 2017 03 Miller Publications.

David Roseberry interviews me for LeaderWorks

I sat down with the Rev. Canon David Roseberry some time ago for this interview, which he titled “Are Muslims really coming to faith in Christ?”

For those of you who have followed my research on this topic, you know the answer is yes. We also talk about the role of Anglican Christianity in relation to converts from Islam to Christianity.

Do also check out David’s fine website, LeaderWorks. You will find it well worth your time.

It’s the Love: guest post at Chad Bird’s blog

I was very pleased to write a guest post for Chad Bird’s blog. Previously I published a guest post at Gladys Ganiel’s blog, and I’m glad to follow that up with this one.

Chad asked me about conversion from Islam to Christianity. What did I think was at the core of the movements we are seeing today?

Here is the intro:

The first time I heard the Breeders was during an episode of Beavis and Butthead, that pinnacle of American civilization and culture. It was the video for their song Cannonball. I loved the austere, lo-fi, sparse production. I loved Kim Deal’s raspy but powerful voice. And, especially, the bass line implanted itself deep in my brain. While I don’t remember the insightful sociological analysis presented by Beavis and Butthead anymore, a love for the Breeders has stuck with me, and over the years as they have come out with new albums I have picked them up (or more recently, downloaded them). Cannonball is from their 1993 album, Last Splash. Their next full-length album was Title TK (2002), followed up by the 2008’s Mountain Battles.

The title track of Mountain Battles is about dealing with an aging parent’s decline in vitality and mental health. But the peppiest track on the album is the irresistible It’s the Love.

And as I thought about this blog post and years of researching converts from Islam to Christianity, the name of the song just wouldn’t leave my brain. Why? Because, in a nutshell, what is the principal draw of Christianity to Muslims? It’s the love. But let me tell you how I learned this.

Read the rest HERE.

Al Fadi interviews Duane Miller, Pt 3

And here is the third and final interview where Al Fadi, a Christian from Saudi Arabia, interviews me on various topics. These include Christians in the Holy Land, that time I had an audience with the Pope, and yes, the controversial Insider Movements. Al Fadi is founder and president of CIRA International.

Enjoy! Check out Part 1 and Part 2 as well.

Al Kresta interviews me on Christianity in the Holy Land

It’s always a pleasure to be interviewed by Al Kresta from Ave Maria Radio.

In this interview, released on January 12th, we shift over to the central topic of Arab Evangelicals in Israel  and, indeed, Christianity in general in the whole region.

The opening question: does Christianity in the Middle East have a future? Listen and enjoy.

Also, visit Al’s website and consider subscribing to his podcast.