Duane Miller’s review of ‘A Wind in the House of Islam’ by David Garrison

July 18, 2014

A Wind in the House of IslamA Wind in the House of Islam by David Garrison

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Review of A Wind in the House of Islam by David Garrison (WIGtake Resources, 2014)

David Garrison is considered to be one of the most competent researchers among evangelical Christians interested in the global dynamics of world Christianity. In this book he investigates the significant number of new movements of people from Islam to Christ. He does this by dividing the house of Islam (and that is a technical term, Dar al Islam) into nine ‘rooms’, each corresponding to a defined region in the Muslim world, like the Arab room, the Persian room, and so on. Most of this book consists of these nine chapters wherein Garrison provides anecdotes and trends he identifies in those ‘rooms’. He also often tries to include the story of how this or that movement was initiated.

This book is concerned with movements, not individual converts, and this is precisely what makes it so valuable and important. There are plenty of books about why individual Muslims convert to Christ, and there are works that treat specific facets of this or that movement to Christ, but this is the first book to summarize on a global level what some movements in the nine rooms of the house of Islam look like.

Garrison is a serious researcher and knows the ins and outs of research in the social sciences. That having been said, readers who are looking for a detailed study with place names will often be disappointed. There is no way to get around these limitations though when it comes to research among apostates in the Muslim world. That something novel is happening among Muslims is incontrovertible, namely that more than ever before in history are converting to Christ. Garrison writes that his historical investigation led him to the following figures: Through the 18th Century there were no movements, in the 19th Century there were two, in the 20th Century there were eleven, and so far in the 21st Century he has identified 69 movements.

Many of his findings confirm findings from previous research: Muslims are attracted to the love of Christ as portrayed in the Bible and by Christians; security and persecution are real problems; Internet and satellite TV have played a huge role; Bible translation has been important, and so on. Garrison summarizes these and other findings in the last section of the book, while also noting that Islam itself has played a role in driving Muslims away from itself in a number of ways: Muhammad’s questionable treatment of women and non-Muslims, disappointment with the Qur’an, inter-Muslim violence, etc.

I can point to two weaknesses in this book, only one of them major. The first one is related to sources. Considering this is the first major book on this topic, the inclusion of more sources is desirable. This book really is written in a popular, and not scholarly level. That is not meant as an insult, but it limits its value for scholars. Perhaps the best way to address this would be to issue a lengthier academic book based on the same research.

Garrison’s references to medieval history represent the main failure of this book. He is clearly not aware of recent research elucidating what the medieval inquisitions were (and were not) and also the Crusades., which could have been written in 1900. When he speaks of the ‘atrocities’ of the Crusaders one might get the impression that these soldiers were exceptionally brutal or merciless. Wrong. For truly outstanding brutality one must look at the Muslim ruler and leader Baybars. And regarding the inquisitions, they took place before civil courts convened and were charged with gathering evidence, the same as our contemporary inquests. Contemporaries were sometimes critical of the inquisitors for not being more zealous in using torture, and a large majority of inquisitions were resolved with no punishment for the person under investigation. And finally, inquisitions were undertaken to investigate Christian heresy, and so Muslims and Jews could not be investigated by an inquisition, that is unless they claimed they had converted to Christianity, but in fact kept teaching aspects of Islam/Judaism contrary to the Christian faith.

One unresolved question was in relation to his rooms in the house of Islam: South America has a small but well-established Muslim population in the country of Guyana. At 7% Muslim, it is the most Islamic country in the Americas. Is there no movement there? Or should this (small) room be added?

Aside from this grievous mistreatment of medieval history, the book has much to commend it. In relation to the so-called insider movements Garrison handles the issue carefully and responsibly, sticking to description and not offering one particular case as exemplary or ideal. Garrison also manages to appreciate the limited context of previous generations of missionaries and indigenous Christians. It is all to easy to criticize the early missionaries in, say, the Ottoman Empire for not evangelizing Muslims, and sometimes those criticisms are fair, but as Garrison understands sometimes there was no possibility for this sort of witness. The same applies to indigenous Christians who century after century resisted the lure of escaping dhimmitude and the jizya (poll tax) by conversion to Islam. One can hope that this book will also be the final nail in the coffin of the C-scale, a tool which so over-simplifies complex concepts like ‘culture’ and ‘form’ to make it less than useful.

Garrison concludes his book with some practical ways that his readers can, if they wish to do so, be part of these various movements from Islam to Christ, though he is rightly clear in explaining that even with all these movements we are talking about fewer than .5% of Muslims world-wide converting to Christ. Discussion questions at the end of each chapter make it ideal for a reading group or prayer group, perhaps used with the recent edition of Operation World.

Reviewed by Dr. Duane Alexander Miller
St Mary’s University
San Antonio, Texas

(This review was originally published in St Francis Magazine, July 2014.)

View all my reviews

Fr. Christopher Metropulos interviews Duane Miller on Orthodox radio

June 28, 2014

I was pleased to be interviewed by Fr. Chris Metropulos for the program Come Receive the Light on the Orthodox Christian Network.

The interview, from June 26th, 2014, can be listened to HERE. The main topic we discuss is conversion from Islam to Christianity.

(For people who listened to the interview and are looking for my doctoral thesis, click here and scroll down.)

Interview avec un berbère convertir de l’islam au christianisme catholique romaine

June 11, 2014

And this time in French. Did you really think I only did English and Arabic?

Hope for the English translation of this (the original) to come out some time later this year. Here is one of the interview questions:

4) Une des classes que j’enseigne ici à Nazareth concerne l’Histoire de l’Église ancienne. L’Afrique du Nord a compté quelques églises très importantes comme Carthage et Hippone ainsi que de grands saints comme saint Augustin, Perpétue, Félicité et Cyprien. Pourtant, le christianisme indigène a été presque totalement absent de la région depuis des siècles. Est-ce que l’histoire des premiers chrétiens de la région représente quelque chose d’important pour les nouveaux Chrétiens d’aujourd’hui? Ou est-ce juste un fait historique intéressant, mais sans grande importance aujourd’hui?

La découverte des saints africains, surtout le plus grand d’entre eux, à savoir Augustin de Thagaste, est toujours revigorante, presque euphorique : « Si mes ancêtres lointains ont été chrétiens, il n’y a donc pas de complexe à l’être », s’est dit plus d’un néophyte. Certains déclarent après leur baptême : « je suis revenu à la religion de mes pères ! » Mais plus généralement tout le christianisme antique permet de se poser la question de la liberté de choix. Si mon ancêtre lointain a choisi librement l’islam, qu’on me permette de faire ce choix moi-même ; mais si cette religion lui a été imposée « bessif » (par l’épée), alors je ne commets aucune trahison, à l’égard de ma tribu, si je la quitte.

Read the rest of my interview with Mohammed-Christophe Bilek at Notre Dame de Kabylie.

Al Kresta from Ave Maria Radio interviews Dr Duane Miller

May 8, 2014

I had the privilege of being interviewed by Al Kresta for his show Kresta in the Afternoon on Ave Maria Radio on one of my main topics of research, namely religious conversion from Islam to Christianity.

The interview begins around the 21st minute.

You can also listen to the audio file HERE or go to the Audio Archive and scroll down to May 7th, Hour 1. You can also listen to it on iTunes.

Lecture 46, The God Class: Christianity, Islam and Religious Conversion

May 2, 2014

Lecture 46, The God Class: Christianity, Islam and Religious Conversion

May 2014, at St Mary’s University, San Antonio, Texas.

Final lecture of Spring 2014 for SMC1314.

Lecture 45, The God Class: The Return of Global Christianity and Vatican II

May 2, 2014

Lecture 45, The God Class:  The Return of Global Christianity and Vatican II

New article: May Muslims in Israel-Palestine become Christians?

May 1, 2014

An article of mine was recently published in St Francis Magazine, Vol 10:1, April 2014. The title of the article is “Religious Freedom in Israel-Palestine: may Muslims become Christians, and do Christians have the freedom to welcome such converts?”

Here is the abstract:

This research represents a continuation and elaboration on Miller’s research for the Christianity and Freedom project, presented in Rome in December of 2013. This article seeks to understand the challenges and context of Christians who are also ex-Muslims in the Holy Land. Attention is paid to the difference between the contexts in the West Bank and Israel, and how the established Christian Churches sometimes safeguard their own precarious sense of security by turning away Muslims who seek to know more about the Christian faith and converts from Islam.

Download it at my Academia.edu page or from St Francis Magazine.

Lecture 44, The God Class: Islam and Christianity

April 28, 2014

Lecture 44, The God Class: Islam and Christianity

April 2014, St Mary’s University, San Antonio, Texas.

Lecture 43, The God Class: The Protestant Reformation

April 28, 2014

Lecture 43, The God Class: The Protestant Reformation

Lecture 42, The God Class: The Lord’s Prayer

April 24, 2014

Lecture 42, The God Class: The Lord’s Prayer


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