Anglican Cathedral Church of the Redeemer, Madrid

So we’re settling down nicely in Madrid. Got a bank account and will hopefully have a flat some time next week. My work here is related to ministry and education, which is pretty much what I’ve been doing since we moved to Nazareth back in 2008.

I’m pleased to be serving as deacon at the Cathedral Church of the Redeemer (Iglesia Catedral del Redentor). This is the only cathedral church of the Reformed Episcopal Church of Spain (Iglesia Española Reformada Episcopal). This is the oldest Protestant church in the country. What privilege to serve at such a historical church. Here are a couple pictures, and then a couple family pictures too.

 

Views from Madrid

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We recently arrived in Madrid and I felt like posting a fw pictures from here. I have taken pictures of various places that denote the strong Latin American presence here, though I have also seen many signs with Arabic of Islamic terms as well.

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From top to bottom: Need Santeria? We got it right here in Madrid. Middle: My daughter with a traditional breakfast of churros and hot chocolate. Bottom: “Restaurante Aroma Latina”. Lots of dishes from (I think) Puert Rico and/or the Dominican Republic.

The Trinity in the Qur’an

Great quote here from “What Every Christian Needs to Know About the Qur’an” by James R. White –

“We simply must insist that if its author believed Christians hold to three gods, Allah, Mary, and evidently their offspring, Jesus, then the Qur’an is the result of human effort, is marked by ignorance and error, and so is not what Muslims claim it to be.”

Start reading this book for free: http://a.co/3SSrmSv

Comments on ‘A Clockwork Orange’

A Clockwork OrangeA Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

[Spoiler Alert] Dark, haunting, disturbing. I enjoyed reading the full, original version–the one published in the UK. That is not where the book ends off in the American version or the movie for that matter.

This is not exactly an end-of-the-world book, but it does show you England in a state of decline under a decadent, socialist (?) government. The violence towards humans and the license afforded the entitled and, to be frank, useless Alex (and his droogs) will ring a bell with some of youth culture today. In this Burgess was able to glimpse the shape of future things to come.

At the end of the book Alex starts to think about the permanent things in life–family, work, marriage, children. In this, I think, he was wrong. The shape of our modern post-WW2 ‘liberal’ world order is one of the disenchantment–teaching people not to love anything at all, with the assumption that people will not fight. After all, people only fight about things they care about. And if people don’t care about anything–their homeland, their people, their heritage, their god, their future–then we will have that twisted vision of peace which assumes that peace is nothing more than an absence of violence. The revival of populism (Trump) and nationalism (Brexit) reveal the disintegration of this program for disenchantment.

But Alex (and Burgess) was living in a world wherein marriage and family still had a sort of enchantment to them–a sense that they were among the permanent things. But we, in the West, have destroyed that enchantment. The only thing truly wicked anyone can do anymore is tell someone else that what they are doing is wicked. We have traded meaning for power. But a rootless power carries within it the seeds of its own destruction. Ergo, the West: a civilization without a future and unable to consider its past, and is actively breeding itself out of existence. Call it unnatural desolation, if you will.

If anything, our present is darker than the world of Alex because redemption and maturation were options for Alex. Not so for the droogs of today, who are more mediocre in their pernicious acts just as they are beyond redemption in our disenchanted saecula.

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